September 13

ELA A30 Section A3 – Scandals of the Past (Immigration)

Some students are about to start section A3 in the course, which recognizes all the accomplishments and successes of Canada’s past that we are well versed on, but this section also puts a magnifying glass over scandals in our history that people can go a lifetime not knowing about.

Like that British subjects once arrived on our West Coast by boat and had every right to enter Canada, which was a British dominion. However, the country at that time didn’t want “brown people”, so new laws were created specifically to keep them out. Canada, the Canadian government and its leader at the time, Stephen Harper, had to make an apology to this community of Canadians for their mistreatment in our history.

Immigration is a huge hot topic right now, not just for Canada, but world-wide.

The following poem has become quite popular to express what it’s like to be the immigrant fleeing home.

 

No one leaves home unless home is the mouth of a shark

Poem by poet Warsan Shire:

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no one leaves home unless
home is the mouth of a shark
you only run for the border
when you see the whole city running as well

your neighbors running faster than you
breath bloody in their throats
the boy you went to school with
who kissed you dizzy behind the old tin factory
is holding a gun bigger than his body
you only leave home
when home won’t let you stay.

no one leaves home unless home chases you
fire under feet
hot blood in your belly
it’s not something you ever thought of doing
until the blade burnt threats into
your neck
and even then you carried the anthem under
your breath
only tearing up your passport in an airport toilets
sobbing as each mouthful of paper
made it clear that you wouldn’t be going back.

you have to understand,
that no one puts their children in a boat
unless the water is safer than the land
no one burns their palms
under trains
beneath carriages
no one spends days and nights in the stomach of a truck
feeding on newspaper unless the miles travelled
means something more than journey.
no one crawls under fences
no one wants to be beaten
pitied

no one chooses refugee camps
or strip searches where your
body is left aching
or prison,
because prison is safer
than a city of fire
and one prison guard
in the night
is better than a truckload
of men who look like your father
no one could take it
no one could stomach it
no one skin would be tough enough

the
go home blacks
refugees
dirty immigrants
asylum seekers
sucking our country dry
niggers with their hands out
they smell strange
savage
messed up their country and now they want
to mess ours up
how do the words
the dirty looks
roll off your backs
maybe because the blow is softer
than a limb torn off

or the words are more tender
than fourteen men between
your legs
or the insults are easier
to swallow
than rubble
than bone
than your child body
in pieces.
i want to go home,
but home is the mouth of a shark
home is the barrel of the gun
and no one would leave home
unless home chased you to the shore
unless home told you
to quicken your legs
leave your clothes behind
crawl through the desert
wade through the oceans
drown
save
be hunger
beg
forget pride
your survival is more important

no one leaves home until home is a sweaty voice in your ear
saying-
leave,
run away from me now
i dont know what i’ve become
but i know that anywhere
is safer than here

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June 8

ELA B10 Starting Macbeth – the Scottish play!

To begin our look at Macbeth, we considered the possible influences for our choices:

  1. Fault: we make our own decisions, exert free will, so we alone are responsible for successes or failures
  2. Fate: timing of events/sequencing can be all it takes to set up a circumstance that leads to our downfall – could it be just coincidence or destiny that leads us to success or failure?
  3. Influence: people that surround us has differing levels of influence on us. Those who are more persuasive can be quite impacting, so could it be less our success/failure and more someone else’s at times?

To start the play, it’s helpful to have a basic overview of what the play is about and who the players are. This summary cartoon does a great job of that. Watch up to about six minutes in. That leaves the ending/tragedies that unfold still to be discovered as we read/perform the play.

 

 

There’s also the continued conspiracy theory that Shakespeare isn’t the sole author of all he’s credited for writing. An interesting film/documentary was made looking into that possibility.

 

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June 2

June 2 Social 9: Individual Research Project – Imperialism of Past Civilizations

You’ve been earning points as Teams, so far, but in this Project you’ll work Individually and be able to earn points yourself. You will still work with your Team and share ideas for research methods, how to take good notes or what format to use to share what you’ve learned with your Teammates. The points you earn, though, will be yours individually.

For your Research Project:

  • gather/develop notes, collect maps, images, diagrams etc to help with your explanation of your findings
  • make sure you write things out in your own words – cutting and pasting what you don’t understand is a waste of your time
  • use dictionaries or Google search words you aren’t familiar with to help you understand
  • use a variety of sources for your research:
    • the first few sites from a Google search aren’t necessarily the best ones for you
    • you can also search through YouTube videos to gather information
    • sometimes with your search you can add “PPT”, “PDF”, or “Textbook” and find different sources to help you

As a Team, you will divide up the Six Civilizations to be researched, so that each is covered by a member of your Team. When the research time is finished, you will teach your peers about the Imperialism of your two selected Civilizations and time period.

  • Understanding your audience is your own classmates should help you understand how to develop your notes and information
  • Civilizations to be studied: one member from your Team must research two of the following civilizations. For the groups with Four Teammates, you will have some overlap, but you will all still do the research and notetaking individually. Example: Team Coke might divide them as follows – Cole (Rome/Spain), Eve (Macedonia/France), Olivia (England/Mongolia), Kaylin (Spain/Macedonia)
    • The quality and degree of thoroughness of your collected information and ability to make it understandable to your peers will play a large role in how many points you individually may acquire through this project.Image result for imperialism
    • The Civilizations to select from are:
      • Rome
      • Spain
      • Macedonia
      • England
      • France
      • Mongolia

Research Guiding Questions:

  1. Define the following terms in a way that you are able to understand them:
    1. Worldview of a Civilization
    2. Imperialism
    3. Colonization
    4. Assimilation
    5. Paternalism
  2. What is the difference between Imperialism and Colonization, or is there a difference?
  3. With Imperialism examples of the past in general,
    1. what were the reasons for it?
    2. what methods were used?
  4. What are some of the Pros (benefits) and Cons (negatives) you can recognize of Imperialism?
  5. What is the difference between Assimilation and Paternalism? In your opinion, which was a better method to use when going through Imperialism expansion of territories?
  6. Research/gather information specifically of two of the civilizations listed above. (Remember that all six civilizations must be covered collectively by your team. You’ll have to discuss and decide who will do which one.)
    For each civilization you’ve selected, identify the following:

    1. What was the Worldview or perspective of that civilization that led to its Imperialism expansion?
    2. What triggered or led up to the Imperialism? What were the factors that caused it to happen in that civilization and at that time?
    3. What methods were used for their Imperialism? How did they go about it and how successful were they?
    4. What were the ultimate results of your civilization’s Imperialism?
    5. What Pros and Cons can you identify of that civilization’s Imperialism history?
      Remember: You’ll each gather information for all five questions for BOTH your Civilizations. 
May 11

May 11/17 Social 9 Team Challenge #1

One focus of working in teams is to develop cooperative and productive interpersonal skills. Another is to add an element of Competition to the class.Image result for team challenge gif

Your team’s first challenge in competition against the other teams is this:

Discuss, search, and determine what our most valuable artifact of past peoples is.

To reveal your answer, you will:

  • post your response as a video explanation on your Team Instagram account.
    • Make it a habit for all Instagram posts to:
      • add the #ksoc9 hashtag
      • tag the two other teams in your post
  • Your answer to the challenge must be prepared/planned out and include:
    • your reasoning for your conclusion, with adequate support
    • an explanation/overview of the artifact item and why it’s the most valuable to our shared history as a human race
    • images – these can be displayed on other team member’s iPads and recorded during your explanation
    • the inclusion of all members of the team in the explanation of your choice (everyone must play a role in the presentation other than “recorder”)
    • bonus points for
      • clarity of presentation
      • creativity
      • tech skills
      • focus (don’t make too much of a game out of this)

As this will be our first Team Challenge, we’ll review after each presents their findings to develop some pros/cons from the samples and build a set of expectations/rules for the future Challenges.

Good luck!

May 4

Social 9: Documentary Viewing – How did people of the past survive?

You’ve learned a few things through your own research about the many past civilizations of our history. But have you questioned how you can know these things?

  • How has this knowledge been gathered?
  • Are there differing accounts or explanations for some beliefs of the past?
  • Who benefits from these accounts of history?
  • What voices are missing from our record of our human past?

This documentary is nearly 2 hours, so it will fill at least two class periods. Your During Viewing job is to take jot notes of ideas mentioned in the documentary. You’ll have a discussion about what your reaction and thoughts are after viewing, either in person or you’ll post reflections through your new Twitter #ksoc9 account.

Developing the Skill of Note-Taking: You have two options while viewing this film:

  1. Medium Challenge Level: take jot notes in just a chronological way like you’ve probably done many times before
  2. Higher Challenge Level: take jot notes and watch for transitions to new topics so that you may differentiate between categories of the documentary. It is a skill that’s important to develop to be able to organize the structure of a text in your summary. The image below shows how you can use indentations, topic headers, etc to try to develop categories of the information.This will not be marked – it is only a challenge to you to test your ability in practicing this skill or establish your note-taking methods early in the class to compare them to your methods later after some practice.

    Image result for note taking outline

 

The Great Human Odyssey

 

 

April 27

ELA B30 Ap 27/17 Watching Hamlet – film/tv/live choices

We’re reading and performing the play Hamlet together as a class, and many of you are doing a wonderful job of injecting some personality and character into your performances of your roles, versus simply reading out lines. It’s important, too, to watch it performed by actors who have studied it and have their own interpretations of how the characters would behave.

Remember, Hamlet is meant to be viewed as a live performance.

There are several options below for watching a multimedia version of Hamlet. Things to consider in making your choice:

  1. They are of different lengths, so if you choose one that’s longer, you may be committing to finishing viewing it at home on your own personal time. It also might be that you would enjoy the longer one more, so it’s worth that extra commitment to you.
  2. The play was intended to be performed live. Watching the live performance may seem more authentic to how it would have been originally received in Shakespeare’s time. And Benedict Cumberbatch is a pretty hot looking Hamlet. 🙂
  3. You may prefer one actor over another. Kenneth Branagh and Mel Gibson are both well known for their portrayals of Hamlet, though one happens in a more recent modern setting and the other happens in a more medieval castle type setting. Lots will go into your choice.Image result for benedict cumberbatch hamlet

Enjoy, though! This should only reinforce what we’ve already been reading together of the play.

And note: I’m encouraging you to watch in your video choice only as far as we have currently read. If you watch beyond that, you’ll still follow along with us in our performance of the play in class.

Performed January 2017Benedict Cumberbatch as Hamlet, performed on stage in front of live audience but with moving cameras. This is a great production to watch, because you can hear the audience laugh during the comedy lines. It was recorded and broadcast to Movie Theaters across the UK.

 

 

 Image result for hamlet 2009
Hamlet (2009)- David Tennent as lead.Image result for hamlet 1990 hamlet
Hamlet (1990 film) – Mel Gibson as Hamlet
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