December 5

ELA A10 B7 Quests and Adventures

 

Personal Online Search:
Find an article online that explores the benefits of engaging in long literature texts, like in novel reading. You will find a partner(s) and have a brief group discussion (6-10 minutes long) to compare what you find.

** Make sure a partner in the group records the discussion and submits it with a proper file name.

Active Reading Activity: “The Sniper”

  • We have practiced reading a short story and using the active reading slips of paper to help you start looking for elements within the text, such as predictions, or confirming beliefs.
  • Make a COPY of this digital copy, give it your own title (Name – The Sniper), and read through the text WHILE looking for examples of the list of active reading prompts within the text.
    • Highlight a portion of the text you want to make an observation of and Add a Comment that includes:
      • the number correlating to the prompt
      • the prompt name
      • your observation explained.
    • Example: #3 Clarify something – I think…….

 

 

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October 2

ELA A10 The Value of Imagination – pgs 1-5 links/digital resources

This section looks at some of the most creative ways people have used their imagination, as well as some of the very strange uses of it.

(Below) Audio narration and text of the story. Listen while you read, if it helps with your comprehension.


Additional Examples of Creativity and Imagination:

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September 3

A1 Mystery and Suspense – Writing Challenge Samples

What makes a good mystery story? Is it something different than the key elements that make a good regular story?

We reviewed the plot diagram of stories: starts with a problem, rising action, a climax point of tension, the falling action, and a resolution of some time at the end. It always includes a character in a situation they don’t want to be in.

You were challenged to write your own mystery story, but with a catch – you only had 8-9 minutes to do it and were restricted to a max of 10-12 sentences. Now we want to see how everyone did!

These are the stories you each developed.

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December 4

ELA A10 What Makes a Hero?

In your Quests and Adventures section, you’re asked to consider what qualities, in your experience, make someone a hero. Having made that list and considered your own opinion on the subject, pick one of the following articles to read and develop a response to. Instructions are included in your handout for after reading. 

  1. Choose which of the two above articles you want to read and make a list of the points made within the article.

What Makes a Hero (article) if the criteria for what makes a hero were changed, would there be more or less labelled heroes in the world?

Why we Need Saviours (article) the benefits and reason for heroism stories popularity in media

2. Following your reading, you’ll engage in a discussion with others who selected the same text. 

 

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October 30

ELA MLA Citation Guide & Links

If you pursue post-secondary education, the odds are you’ll have to develop a piece of writing that requires in-text citations and a Works Cited page. Here are some resources to use as a guide for that:

In-text citation guide:

  • author and page #
  • anonymous authors
  • text from an anthology or collection
  • multiple authors
  • internet sources

Citing non-print or sources from the Internet

With more and more scholarly work being posted on the Internet, you may have to cite research you have completed in virtual environments. While many sources on the Internet should not be used for scholarly work (reference the OWL’s Evaluating Sources of Information resource), some Web sources are perfectly acceptable for research. When creating in-text citations for electronic, film, or Internet sources, remember that your citation must reference the source in your Works Cited.

Sometimes writers are confused with how to craft parenthetical citations for electronic sources because of the absence of page numbers, but often, these sorts of entries do not require a page number in the parenthetical citation. For electronic and Internet sources, follow the following guidelines:

  • Include in the text the first item that appears in the Work Cited entry that corresponds to the citation (e.g. author name, article name, website name, film name).
  • You do not need to give paragraph numbers or page numbers based on your Web browser’s print preview function.
  • Unless you must list the Web site name in the signal phrase in order to get the reader to the appropriate entry, do not include URLs in-text. Only provide partial URLs such as when the name of the site includes, for example, a domain name, like CNN.com or Forbes.com as opposed to writing out http://www.cnn.com or http://www.forbes.com.

Works Cited page – basic guidelines

Basic rules

  • Begin your Works Cited page on a separate page at the end of your research paper. It should have the same one-inch margins and last name, page number header as the rest of your paper.
  • Label the page Works Cited (do not italicize the words Works Cited or put them in quotation marks) and center the words Works Cited at the top of the page.
  • Double space all citations, but do not skip spaces between entries.
  • Indent the second and subsequent lines of citations by 0.5 inches to create a hanging indent.
  • List page numbers of sources efficiently, when needed. If you refer to a journal article that appeared on pages 225 through 250, list the page numbers on your Works Cited page as 225-250. Note that MLA style uses a hyphen in a span of pages.
  • If you’re citing an article or a publication that was originally issued in print form but that you retrieved from an online database, you should type the online database name in italics. You do not need to provide subscription information in addition to the database name.

Easybib Citation Maker: this website can be helpful for easily making your Works Cited page.

 

June 25

What’s on my bookshelf? Check online to see!

There are a lot of cool books on the shelves of the bookcase at the back of the room. Most are separated to fit their best course or genre that they relate to, but it can be deceiving, since many overlap and fit a number of high school ELA courses.

To help you see what your options are and decide,  I’ve created online shelves in GoodReads. At the link below, you can skim through and read summaries to every book on my shelf and get a sense of its topic, rather than judging by colour.

Curious about a book? Ask me about it!

GoodReads Shelves Ms Waldner

You’ll see on the left of the page a number of Shelves – click through them to skim books that apply and are potential choices within your class.

 

November 30

ELA A10: Quest and Journey Stories

Your next section focuses on the theme of Challenges and what greater challenge story exists other than Quest stories? You probably have read stories or novels that include a quest story and it may

Image result for how to read literature like a professor for kids

be the elements of it that draws you to these story types.

The following short text will give you an explanation of what a Quest Story must include to be a true quest. Take notes on your handout so that you may assess the short story you eventually pick to guage whether it is really a quest story or not.

B7 How to Read Literature Like a Prof – Quests-23t2h03

 

Link to selection of Quest Stories to choose from: click here

There are 25 short stories of Quests on this page. Skim through them to pick the best choice for yourself and your interests.

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November 2

ELA A10 Essay Prompts for Individual Novel Reading 2017

Almost all of you have selected a novel to read that interests you personally. Some of your choices are more related to the Mystery theme of the first half of ELA A10 and other c

Image result for young adult novel reading

hoices are novels related to the Challenges theme for the second half of our course. Either way, there are a number of essay prompts for you to select from so that you may consider them and watch to collect evidence to support the essay prompt while you’re reading your novel.

You’ll want to look for examples in the book that support the topic of your essay and collect those examples by page number and possibly even which phrases specifically on that page you’ll use in your supporting paragraph.

There are a number of prompts; you can pick the same one that a friend has selected, because no two people (so far) are reading the same novels.

 

Mystery Essay Prompts to pick from:

  1. Science fiction books often warn society of the potential dangers or misuses of science and/or technology development in the future. Analyze three ways your selected novel accomplishes this.
  2. Identify and analyze three significant themes of the novel you read.
  3. Analyze three characteristics of your novel choice that make it fit the science fiction (sci-fi) genre.
  4. Dystopian societies are futuristic, potential societies that exist with different government, power, and value systems. Example: The society of Panem from The Hunger Games. Analyze how your novel choice also develops this type of alternative society.
  5. The development of conflict and dramatic rise to a climax is an important part of good mystery novels. Analyze the three main events that promote or establish the drama of the plot.
  6. Authors often develop characters with a bias, ensuring readers will either like or not like the character as intended. Analyze how the author of your novel uses this writing technique with three significant characters.
  7. Antagonists stand in the way of the protagonist achieving their goal. Analyze three ways your book’s antagonist accomplishes this.

Challenges Essay Prompts to pick from:

  1. Analyze three ways characters face the obstacles they are struggling with.
  2. Analyze three types of conflict that exists/is represented in the novel.
  3. Identify and analyze the role of secondary characters and how they impact the plot/outcome of the story.
  4. Dynamic characters develop internally/mentally/emotionally. Identify/analyze three characters that grow because of certain experiences they have in the book.
  5. Some relationships are positive influences, while others are negative and destructive. Analyze three relationships in the book for whether they are positive or negative ones.
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January 13

ELA A10 Jan 13/17 Watching Your Selected Documentary

You should naturally have a habit now of thinking of a text in stages of Before, During, and After. You’ll have to submit evidence that you used strategies for each step to help you make meaning and connections to the text you chose to study.

Some options of what you can review/analyse/write out to prepare yourself for viewing include:

Before Studying/Viewing the Documentary:

  • setting a purpose for why you’re going to view the film
  • reminding yourself of what the characteristics of a documentary are
  • consider the style you observed in watching The Cove and how they constructed their argument and their methods to persuade the viewers
  • Set certain questions for yourself that you hope are answered by the text
  • Look up some background information about the documentary you’ve chosen

During Studying/Viewing the Documentary: 

  • make jot notes of things that stand out to you as you watch the film
  • record the questions you find yourself asking as you’re watching that you may later look up the answers to
  • keep a list of elements of the film you’re critical of or find suspicious
  • monitor your own reactions, mentally and emotionally, to the storyline and images you view

After Studying/Viewing the Documentary:

  • write a personal reflection of how you feel/your thoughts immediately after viewing the film
  • write out questions you have, now that you’ve completed watching it
  • read reviews of the film to check if your reaction is similar to how others received it
  • Tweet comments/reflections out about the documentary
  • make a T-chart and list some of the things you wrote down During Viewing on the left and on the right side expand on why they stood out to you

To prepare for your final assignment, a presentation and informal talk, you’ll need to review and possible rewatch parts of the film for the following:

 

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