February 6

Social 9 Basics of World Civilizations – optional resources

You’re using a variety of resources of your choice online to find answers to several questions. It will help you establish a basic understanding of some of the important elements of studying civilizations before we move on in the course. Elements like how eras of time are labeled as B.C. or A.D. or how old the earth is compared to how old humankind is. Below are a few helpful video resources you can watch to help supplement your own research.

 

 

 

Stonehenge Resources:



February 6

ELA B30: Compare/Contrast Essay Writing

One of the formal writing assignments in the B30 course is to write a Compare/Contrast Essay. You have previously written some Analytical Essays, some Persuasive or Editorial Essays, and a Critical Analysis Essay after reading your novel choice in ELA A30.

For this assignment, the two texts you’ll compare are a short story and film. The focus of your essay will be to compare the theme of identity explored between both texts.

Some resources for each are given below:

Text #1 Essay: “Shooting an Elephant”
A1.1 Shooting An Elephant owell essay-1mhdr0g  PDF Copy of text

YouTube Video: Oral reading of the essay (someone with an English accent like the author would have had)

Text #2 Movie: The Interpreter (2 hrs 8 mins)

The Interpreter Imbd website information with character names
Note: I’ve purchased this film on YouTube. If you want to watch it outside of class time at school, I can arrange to sign you into the ELA YouTube Account to watch it.

Additional Text Options: There are several other films that focus on the theme of identity. If you have an idea for another film that will pair well with the Orwell essay, talk to me about it.
Optional Videos I can provide: click links to view trailers
The Power of One (movie)
Hotel Rwanda (movie)
Cinderella Man (movie)
Million Dollar Baby (movie)

Planning the Writing Assignment

Organizing a Compare/Contrast Essay – outline
This website resource includes a helpful method of planning for this type of writing. It offers a sample comparison topic, focusing on whether cats or dogs are better pets.

A1.1 Organizer WritingaCompareContrastEssay-1k5cckj PDF Copy

 

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January 9

ELA 9 Indendent Novel Reading – Initial Observations

Everyone’s picked a new novel they’re going to read on their own, but good readers think about the writing as they progress through a book. It’s important to consider certain questions at the beginning of a book; it helps establish a deeper Image result for beginning a new book quoteunderstanding of the complex plot the author developed and helps you make connections to the rest of the text as you read along.

Activity:
After you’ve read enough of the beginning of your book (maybe 20 – 40 pages), pause a moment to consider some of the following prompts. You don’t have to answer all of them and shouldn’t respond with a Question-Answer format. Just journal your thoughts as they come together.

Prompts to consider from the beginning development of your book:

  • The setting is a super important part of a book’s beginning. Whether a series of events happens in the past, the present or the future, the possible outcomes depend on when in time the events happen. Where it is happening, that you understand the surroundings, the locations the main character goes back and forth from, and where they are in relation to others around them, these are also all parts of the setting to consider. Some authors may develop this really clearly at the beginning while others maybe don’t pay enough attention to it. How is the development of setting affecting the way you are reacting to the book? 
  • Main character development – We usually have to be able to relate to a character if we want to follow them along through their experiences. Even if they have very different qualities than you, you often can find similarities with them from the ideas they have, the way they treat people, the hopes they have, their background etc. How are you connecting with your novel’s main character? 
  • What about the author’s style of writing do you like, so far? Or what about it do you not like, so far? It can be how they use dialogue. It can be whether personality shows through in descriptions of how characters act around others. It can be how they divide the chapters; some of the most popular books have chapters that end with a bang and entice readers to keep reading! Some authors may use sentences that are too long. Others may use some that are too choppy.
  • Establishing the problem: Every story is about a character in a situation they don’t want to be in. The rest of the story is about their attempt to solve their situation and the distractions that get in their way. If an author develops the beginning of a book for too long, though, without identifying the problem, a reader may lose interest and feel the pace is dragging. An author may fail to create a believable problem, oversell the danger and not deliver with an exciting story to follow. With what you’ve read so far, a) are you aware of the conflict the main character wants to solve and b) is it an interesting problem/does it make for a good story in your opinion?

 

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December 6

ELA 9: Dec 6 Writing/Speaking Challenges

We’ve played a bit with some creative activities. Here is a collection of some Speaking and Writing Challenges to choose from to experiment a bit more.

Speaking Challenges:

Narrate/Record the letter addressed to Inspiration.

Narrate/Record this break-up letter addressed to KFC staff.

Voice Acting Challenge: Record this Gollum-like character who is utterly useless

 

 

Writing Challenges:

Write about the worst customer service experience you ever had.

Write a poem about how nasty Poison Ivy is.

Write a completely fake bio of yourself. (reinvent your life)

Write a Dear Diary entry as a dog.

Finish this sentence: “Nothing makes me more uncomfortable than…

Write a story in 140 characters (letters)

Write an exchange between comical/bitter rivals

 

 

Visualizing Challenge:

Create a meme out of this cat image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 30

ELA A10: Quest and Journey Stories

Your next section focuses on the theme of Challenges and what greater challenge story exists other than Quest stories? You probably have read stories or novels that include a quest story and it may

Image result for how to read literature like a professor for kids

be the elements of it that draws you to these story types.

The following short text will give you an explanation of what a Quest Story must include to be a true quest. Take notes on your handout so that you may assess the short story you eventually pick to guage whether it is really a quest story or not.

B7 How to Read Literature Like a Prof – Quests-23t2h03

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November 2

ELA A10 Essay Prompts for Individual Novel Reading 2017

Almost all of you have selected a novel to read that interests you personally. Some of your choices are more related to the Mystery theme of the first half of ELA A10 and other c

Image result for young adult novel reading

hoices are novels related to the Challenges theme for the second half of our course. Either way, there are a number of essay prompts for you to select from so that you may consider them and watch to collect evidence to support the essay prompt while you’re reading your novel.

You’ll want to look for examples in the book that support the topic of your essay and collect those examples by page number and possibly even which phrases specifically on that page you’ll use in your supporting paragraph.

There are a number of prompts; you can pick the same one that a friend has selected, because no two people (so far) are reading the same novels.

 

Mystery Essay Prompts to pick from:

  1. Science fiction books often warn society of the potential dangers or misuses of science and/or technology development in the future. Analyze three ways your selected novel accomplishes this.
  2. Identify and analyze three significant themes of the novel you read.
  3. Analyze three characteristics of your novel choice that make it fit the science fiction (sci-fi) genre.
  4. Dystopian societies are futuristic, potential societies that exist with different government, power, and value systems. Example: The society of Panem from The Hunger Games. Analyze how your novel choice also develops this type of alternative society.
  5. The development of conflict and dramatic rise to a climax is an important part of good mystery novels. Analyze the three main events that promote or establish the drama of the plot.
  6. Authors often develop characters with a bias, ensuring readers will either like or not like the character as intended. Analyze how the author of your novel uses this writing technique with three significant characters.
  7. Antagonists stand in the way of the protagonist achieving their goal. Analyze three ways your book’s antagonist accomplishes this.

Challenges Essay Prompts to pick from:

  1. Analyze three ways characters face the obstacles they are struggling with.
  2. Analyze three types of conflict that exists/is represented in the novel.
  3. Identify and analyze the role of secondary characters and how they impact the plot/outcome of the story.
  4. Dynamic characters develop internally/mentally/emotionally. Identify/analyze three characters that grow because of certain experiences they have in the book.
  5. Some relationships are positive influences, while others are negative and destructive. Analyze three relationships in the book for whether they are positive or negative ones.
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